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The Challenge of Expanding Secondary Education and Training in Madagascar: World Bank Working Paper No. 141
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Foreword by: Jacob Bregman.
ISBN-10: 0-8213-7503-2 (0821375032)
ISBN-13: 978-0-8213-7503-7 (9780821375037)
Language: English
No. of Pages: xxiv + 100

Item Identification Code (UID#): 3815
Shelving Location: Health & Education
Estimated Value: £20.00
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The Challenge of Expanding Secondary Education and Training in Madagascar

World Bank Working Paper No. 141

(Africa Human Development Series)
The World Bank (2008).
Softcover Book

Text from the Back Cover

The Challenge of Expanding Secondary Education and Training in Madagascar is part of the World Bank Working Paper series. These papers are published to communicate the results of the Bank's ongoing research and to stimulate public discussion. This report, produced with the help of Madagascar's national education team in 2006-07, is designed to contribute to ongoing education reform discussions. It analyzes the constraints to system expansion and presents possible next steps for an appropriate course of action. This report aims to encourage discussion among policymakers, stakeholders and donors, and does not promote one approach over another. To promote a more competitive economy in Madagascar in the 21st century, the government expects to increase the average years of schooling from the current 4.5 years to about 9-10 years by 2015 for the relative age groups. This report discusses the ongoing reform and its impact and provides suggestions for implementation. This report is intended to be used as a discussion instrument and to be disseminated among Madagascar's stakeholders in education. We hope this report will contribute to improved implementation of the secondary education reform in Madagascar. This study was prepared as part of the Secondary Education and Training in Africa (SEIA) initiative which aims to assist countries to develop sustainable strategies for expansion and quality improvements in secondary education and training. All SEIA products are available on its website: www.worldbank.org/afr/seia.

Foreword from Page vii

Many African countries are undertaking important economic reforms, improving macroeconomic management, liberalizing markets and trade, and widening the space for private sector activity. Where such reforms have been sustained they produced economic growth and reduced poverty. However, Africa still faces serious development challenges in human development, notably in post-primary education. The World Bank incorporated this within its Africa Action Plan (AAP) by underscoring the fundamental importance of expanding not only primary but also secondary and higher education, and linking it to employment options for African youth.
Madagascar is making significant progress in achieving its EFA goals of providing universal primary education. It has recently decided to initiate far-reaching reforms in its primary and secondary education cycles. Good quality primary graduates are necessary for entry into the secondary education cycles in Madagascar. But equally important is the quality and relevance of what is taught and learned in secondary schools. This is one of the keys for accelerated economic growth and effective social development. International global trends in secondary education provide a useful framework for undertaking the current reform in secondary education. Madagascar's labor market needs more and better secondary graduates with "modern knowledge and better skills" to make its economy competitive and to attract overseas investments in the country. Asia and Latin America have already shown the way. However, to make the expansion of post-primary education services in Madagascar sustainable the system should become much more efficient and produce better results (in terms of quality and quantity).
This study was prepared at the request of the government under the "Secondary Education In Africa (SEIA)" program of the Africa Human Development Department of the World Bank. The objective of the SEIA program is to assist countries to develop sustainable strategies for expansion and quality improvement in secondary education. The study was produced with the help of Madagascar's national education team in 2006–07.All SEIA reports are available at: www.worldbank.org/afr/seia.
This report is designed to contribute to ongoing education reform discussions. It analyses the constraints to system expansion and presents possible next steps for an appropriate course of action. This report aims to encourage discussion among policy-makers, stakeholders and donors, and does not promote one approach over another. To promote a more competitive economy in Madagascar in the 21st century, the government expects to increase the average years of schooling from the current 4.5 years to about 9–10 years by 2015 for the relative age groups. This report discusses the ongoing reform and its impact and provides suggestions for implementation. This report is intended to be used as a discussion instrument and to be disseminated among Madagascar's stakeholders in education. We hope this report will contribute to improved implementation of the secondary education reform in Madagascar.
Jacob Bregman
Lead Education Specialist and SEIA Task Team Leader
Africa Region Human Development
The World Bank

Contents

  • Contents
  • Foreword
  • Acknowledgments
  • Acronyms and Abbreviations
  • Executive Summary
  • Résumé Analytique
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Secondary Education in Madagascar – Structure and Overview
  • 3. Enrollment: Disparities and Constraints
  • 4. Quality Components
  • 5. Cost and Financing
  • 6. Challenges and Options for Secondary Education in Madagascar
  • Appendixes
    • A: Statistic Tables
    • B: Abstract of Secondary Education Programs in Madagascar
    • C: Proposed Curriculum Management System
    • D: Simulations
  • References
  • List of Tables
    • 1.1: Madagascar: Trends in Education Expenditure from 2001 to 2004
    • 1.2: Madagascar’s Education System: Basic Indicators
    • 1.3: Projected Population Estimates for Madagascar
    • 1.4: Urban Labor Demand Simulations – Madagascar
    • 1.5: Schools and Teachers by Cycle
    • 2.1: Student Enrollment in Secondary Education, 2001–06
    • 2.2: New Intakes in First Grade of JSE, 2002–05
    • 2.3: New Intakes in First Grade of SSE, 2002–05
    • 2.4: Distribution of New Intakes among Higher Education Institutions
    • 2.5: Repetition Rates SE, 2004/05 to 2005/06
    • 2.6: Selected Countries with Seven-Year Primary Education
    • 2.7: Main Advantages of Seven-Year Primary Education System
    • 3.1: Primary Completion, Transition to Secondary, and Secondary Gross Enrollment Rates for Selected Sub-Saharan Countries, through 2003
    • 3.2: Gross Enrollment Ratios by Gender in Secondary Education in Madagascar, 2003
    • 3.3: Madagascar – Net Enrollment Rates per Income Level in 2001 and 2004
    • 3.4: Madagascar – Net Enrollment Rates per Education Level in 2005
    • 3.5: Factors Influencing Failure for Girls and Boys
    • 3.6: Share of Student per Age at Entry and Exit Grades per Cycle
    • 3.7: SE Schools Distribution by Examination Pass Rates, 2005
    • 4.1: Qualifications of Public Secondary School Teachers, 2004
    • 4.2: Secondary Education Teacher Training System in Madagascar
    • 4.3: Distribution of SE Teachers by Years of Teaching, 2004
    • 4.4: Recurrent Public Expenditure on Education by Level and Type of Schooling, 2004
    • 4.5: Distribution of Teachers by Teaching Hours per Week, JSE and SSE, 2004
    • 4.6: Madagascar Education Spending, 2004
    • 4.7: Comparing Options for Textbooks and Teaching Guides
    • 5.1: Basic Indicators on Education Resources
    • 5.2: Distribution of Public Expenditures (Recurrent and Capital Expenditures)
    • 5.3: Distribution of Recurrent Education Budget
    • 5.4: Student Unit Recurrent Cost by Level
    • 5.5: Structure of Student Unit Recurrent Costs
    • 5.6: Teacher Salaries and Student to Teacher Ratio, 2004
    • 5.7: Madagascar Teacher to Administrative Staff Ratios
    • 5.8: SE Private School Fees per Year, 2005
    • 6.1: Student Secondary School Enrollment Ratios for SADC Countries
    • A.1: Madagascar – Hypothetical Flow of a Cohort of 1000 Pupils at Public Level CEG
    • A.2: Madagascar – Repetition and Dropout Rate in JSE
    • A.3: Madagascar – Passing Rates to the BEPC and Transition Rates from JSE to SSE
    • A.4: Madagascar – Proportion of Repeaters and Completion Rate in SSE from 1998/99 to 2002/03
    • A.5: Madagascar – Baccalaureat Pass Rates per Track/Stream
    • A.6: Madagascar – Staff Number by Function and Level, 2003–04
    • A.7: Required Class Time in JSE and SSE: Madagascar and Europe
    • A.8: Required Teaching Time: Madagascar and Selected Countries
    • A.9: Structure of the Education System in Sub-Saharan Africa Countries
    • A.10: Organization of the Functions of the Ministry of Education According to Levels of Decentralization
    • D.1: Projected Domestic Resources and Education Costs of a Rapid Expansion of the SE by 2015
  • List of Figures
    • 2.1: Madagascar – Organization of the Education System, 2006
    • 2.2: Madagascar’s TVET system
    • 2.3: Grade Attainment Profile of Cohort – Madagascar 2006
    • 3.1: Secondary Gross Enrollment Rates for Selected Sub-Saharan Africa Countries, through 2002
    • 3.2: Distribution of JSE and SSE Schools by Size of Student Body and Number of Students per Class in 2004
    • 3.3: Distribution of JSE and SSE Schools by Type
    • 4.1: Evolution of the Baccalaureate Pass Rate, 1975–2005
    • 4.2: Madagascar’s SSE Cycle
    • 4.3: Baccalaureate Candidates by Stream
    • 5.1: Madagascar – Unit Costs per Student According to Size of JSE and SSE in 2003
    • 6.1: Madagascar – JSE New Enrollment Projections
  • List of Boxes
    • 4.1: Features of Secondary Education Curriculum in Industrialized Countries
    • 4.2: Leadership Contributes Significantly to SE School Development – Key Outcomes of Headship
    • 4.3: Sixteen Indicators on Quality of School Education
    • 6.1: Experiences of Industrialized Countries in Reducing Repetition Rates
    • 6.2: Public/Private Partnership Can Be One of the Solutions
    • 6.3: Scholarship Programs in Madagascar – Previous Experiences
    • 6.4: Some Features of Improved Teacher Education Curriculum
    • 6.5: Developing Core Competencies
    • 6.6: The Reform of Secondary Education in Indonesia during the 1990s

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